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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Common map projections (Graticules) found in the catalog.

Common map projections (Graticules)

Cecil Edward Abelson

Common map projections (Graticules)

characteristics and uses.

by Cecil Edward Abelson

  • 216 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by C. E. Abelson in [Sevenoaks] .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination29p.,ill.,26cm
Number of Pages29
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19447353M

Projection basics for GIS professionals. Coordinate systems, also known as map projections, are arbitrary designations for spatial purpose is to provide a common basis for communication about a particular place or area on the earth's surface. After decades of using only one map projection, the Polyconic, for its mapping program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) now uses several of the more common projections for its published maps. For larger scale maps, including topographic quadrangles and the State Base Map Series, conformal projections such as the Transverse Mercator and the Lambert Conformal Conic are used.

Investigating Map Projections Investigating Map Projections Students use oranges to investigate the effects of changing a 3-D surface to a 2-D surface. They then examine the distortions of different map projections while comparing land and ocean to its representation on a globe.   Plane Projection• A plane projection is created by placing an imaginary screen directly above or below a globe. The image that would result is called a plane projection. This type of map projection is not commonly used. Interrupted Projection• There are many different types of interrupted projection maps.

  An overview of different map projections; how they are produced and applications of each.   The three classes of map projections Projections can also be described in terms of their aspect: the direction of the projection plane's orientation (whether cylinder, plane or cone) with respect to the globe. The three possible apects of a map projection are normal, transverse and oblique. In a normal projection, the main orientation of the.


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Common map projections (Graticules) by Cecil Edward Abelson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Robinson Projection was developed by Arthur H. Robinson in and was indeed to make world maps “look right” rather than measure precisely.

This now common projection and has been used in many popular maps such as the Rand McNally series (from the s) and the National Geographic Society (since ).Author: Rachel Quist. 79 rows  In standard presentation, azimuthal projections map meridians as straight lines and.

Map projection and coordinate system tasks Common coordinate system and map projection tasks in ArcGIS. Here is a series of links to guidance on how to perform a number of common coordinate system tasks in ArcGIS.

Defining the coordinate systems, re-projecting, and transforming datasets. In cartography, a map projection is a way to flatten a globe's surface into a plane in order to make a map. This requires a systematic transformation of the latitudes and longitudes of locations from the surface of the globe into locations on a plane.

All projections of a sphere on a plane necessarily distort the surface in some way and to some extent. After decades of using only one map projection, the Polyconic, for its mapping program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) now uses several of the more common projections for its published maps.

For larger scale maps, including topographic quadrangles Common map projections book the State Base Map Series, conformal projections such as the Transverse Mercator and the Reviews: 2. The map projection is the image of the globe projected onto the cylindrical surface, which is then unwrapped into a flat surface.

When the cylinder aligns with the polar axis, parallels appear as horizontal lines and meridians as vertical lines. Cylindrical projections can. support operational units. Equations are furnished for map projections and datums commonly used within the Army, and references are provided for other, less commonly encountered, map projections and datums.

SUBJECT TERMS NUMBER OF PAGES Cartography Datums Projections Geodesy Coordinates PRICE CODE Map projection concerns the science of mathematical cartography, the techniques by which the Earth's dimensions, shape and features are translated in map form, be that two-dimensional paper or two- Reviews: 1.

The most common map projections are based on three main geometric shapes: 1) Sphere to a Plane 2) Cylindrical Projections, 3) Conic Projections. Pseudoconic Projections are projections with parallels which are circular arcs with common central points. Unlike conic projections, the meridian is not constrained to be a straight line.

Examples of pseudoconic projections include "bonne", which is an equal-area map projection. The maps are not constrained to rectangles or discs. Analytical derivation of some map projections including examples of pseudocylindrical and polyconic projections is also covered.

Work undertaken in the USA and USSR on the creation of suitable map projections obtained through numerical analysis has been included. The book concludes with a chapter on the abuse and misrepresentation of map. Map Projections A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface.

This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important.

Common map projections (Graticules): Characteristics and uses [Abelson, Cecil Edward] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Common map projections (Graticules): Characteristics and usesAuthor: Cecil Edward Abelson. Projections To create maps, cartographers project the round Earth onto a flat surface — making a map projection.

Distance, shape, direction, or size may be distorted by a projection. As a result, the purpose of the map usu-ally dictates which projection is used. There are many kinds of map projec. Another example is the Robinson projection, which is often used for small-scale thematic maps of the world (it was used as the primary world map projection by the National Geographic Society fromthen replaced with another compromise projection, the Winkel Tripel; thus, the latter has become common in textbooks).

A map projection uses mathematical formulas to relate spherical coordinates on the globe to flat, planar coordinates. Different projections cause different types of distortions. Some projections are designed to minimize the distortion of one or two of the data's characteristics.

A projection could maintain the area of a feature but alter its shape. The item A guide to commonly used map projections prepared for use in Hyper Card, by Tau Rho Alpha, Joe F. Vigil, and Lauren Buchholz represents a specific, individual, material embodiment of a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in Indiana State Library.

This item is. Description: Map projection concerns the science of mathematical cartography, the techniques by which the Earth's dimensions, shape and features are translated in map form, be that two-dimensional paper or two- or three- dimensional electronic representations.

The central focus of this book is on the theory of map projections. can be found in G.B. Lauf's book Geodesy and Map Projections (Lauf ).

GEOMETRY OF ELLIPSOIDAL REFERENCE SURFACE OF THE EARTH An ellipsoid, a. Map projection. way of showing spherical earth on a flat piece of paper. Mercator map. Accurately show direction, shape and land. Robinson map.

a compromise map projection showing the poles as lines rather than points and more accurately portraying high latitude lands and water to land ratio. After decades of using only one map projection, the Polyconic, for its mapping program, the U.S.

Geological Survey (USGS) now uses several of the more common projections for its published maps. For larger scale maps, including topographic quadrangles and the State Base Map Series, conformal projections such as the Transverse Mercator and the.Analytics and projections say no.

The book contains detailed chapters on all 32 teams with advanced stats from the season. the common narrative is that the team is set to take a.The three most common map projections are 1. Cylindrical map projection: One of the most common used projection methods is cylindrical map proj view the full answer.